The old story continues (see related posts), but from a different perspective – some news from the inside.

After a few weeks of training, Amine Derkaoui, a 21-year guy from Morocco, worked as a content moderator for $1 an hour. His job was to view a stream of reported pictures, videos and post and either confirm deletion, unconfirm or escalate to a Facebook employee.

If in doubt – consult the one page cheat-sheet (attached). The full document is included below. Some interesting bullet points. The following is a definite no-no:

  • Blatant (obvious) depiction of camel toes and moose knuckles.
  • Mothers breastfeeding without clothes on.
  • Sex toys or other objects, but only in the context of sexual activity.
  • Depicting sexual fetishes in any form.
  • ANY photoshopped images of people, whether negative, positive or neutral.
  • Images of drunk and unconscious people , or sleeping people with things drawn on their face.
  • Any obvious sexual activity, even if naked parts are hidden from view by hands, clothes or other objects. Cartoons/art included. Foreplay allowed (kissing, groping, etc), even for the same sex (man-man/woman-woman).
  • Violent speech (Example: “I love hearing skulls crack.”).

As you can see – no fetishes (hey, anything can be a fetish object!). No wonder all our accounts were deleted. So it was not related to an “unanimate object” with an unreal name, as we thought.

But! Here comes another interesting part:

“Crushed heads, limbs etc are OK as long as no insides are showing. Deep flesh wounds are ok to show; excessive blood is ok to show.”

No, no way! Please let me out! (Ermmm… Oh… They threw me out three times already… ) Not my cup of tea. Neither was Derkaoui’s. He was one of the moderators who silently quitted because of ridiculous money ($1 an hour? And $100 billion IPO?) Another moderator lasted three weeks because of a the endless torrent of violence he had to clean up.

See the full article on Gawker: Inside Facebook’s Outsourced Anti-Porn and Gore Brigade, Where ‘Camel Toes’ are More Offensive Than ‘Crushed Heads’