Updated on Dec 13, 2010 @ 02:14:
To make a short story long.

Scene 1

My wife is very interested in professional cooking (thanks God! ;-) Under “professional” I mean knowing “details”, knowing “how” and knowing “why”. And there was a LiveJournal community dedicated to this subject. With a helluva of extremely rare information you can’t just find on the Net or in a book store (forget the culinary books). Technology, science, experience, places, products, advises, discussions, recipes, information from trainings (e.g. by Michelin restaurants chefs), photos, tutorials, etc. Gigabytes and gigabytes of stuff.

You guessed what happened, didn’t you? Suddenly the community disappeared. Along with the blog of the owner. Nobody knew why. He did not even want to leave it in the read-only mode. “Samurais do not leave half of the job done”. Under the pressure of plea from thousands of contributors, the owner opened the site for 48 hours. I managed to grab 7.2GB, but that was not all at all.

Scene 2

My virtual (computer) desktop consists of 4 panels: general, naughty, work and developer (mostly related to this site), with a separate set of firefox windows (profiles) for each of the panel. After one of the server reboots, I did not have time to start all the browsers. I had just the “general” one. The work environment moved to a laptop.

The load was (and still is) very high: work, urgent upgrade of “my other hobby equipment” (what included preliminary searching for the info, then troubleshooting – took me about 10 hours a day), almost everyday trainings (for my next sport related quest – 2-3 hours a day – succeeded, BTW ;-) ), language courses, etc. So I had no time to start the “naughty” firefox. Or read mail. I haven’t checked several of my mailboxes (not only the “naughty” ones) for months. Libido? What’s that? I can’t even find my swimsuits since half a year ago! ;-)

Scene 3

And only then I realized why people commit virtual suicides. Usually, “working” on the site takes me at least 5 hours. Daily. It’s like a full-time but unpaid job. Abandoning this “hobby” would save me one fifth of my life I can spend on my family, house, learning, reading books, listening to music, just enjoying life. No obligations, no caring, no thinking of updates, trouble fixes, mails, etc.

“I’ve had enough!”. Kill! Delete! Purge! Remove! Format! Freedom!


Scene 4

Ha! Not that easy.

1. The hobby is still there. You can’t get rid of it. It’s impossible. Some hobbies can be forgotten about, but “fetishism” is incurable. Proved by “phychodoctors”.

2. It’s OK for one-man-sites. Yes, pity for the visitors, lurkers, passive users. But if only one man pays, provides and delivers – it’s fully up to him. The rest can only bow and say “thank you”. (See Patrick’s comments below).

But this does not work for communities like above. That “samurai” destroyed what did not belong to him. He killed the content created by others. Unique content.

Scene 5

“If you are able not to write, do not write”. If you can live without something probably you do not need it. Obligations kill creativity, passion, willingness…

Scene 6

All freed up time will be immediately eaten up ;-)

Posted on Jun 15, 2010 @ 02:14:

It’s not about losing all the data from your website as a result of a hacker or FTC attack (see this post). Such “accidents” teach you to be flexible, to work 24 hours a day and to regularly make backups.

No, I’m talking about what media call “virtual social suicide”. When people destroy their own sites and/or wipe out everything from the social time-wasting-networks like Facebook, MySpace, Hyves or VKontakte.

Some cases have been mentioned here. For example, A.D.I.D.A.S (Megabondagedaemon) or Zentaoid. But now it’s getting more serious.

Patrick Andraste deleted all his LiveJournals and put the following on RubberBound:

All good things must eventually come to an end. I have been working on this website for many years now. It started as a fun adventure. Over the years though, it became a not so fun adventure and now I must bow out.

He left content on his “main” sites, but you must know the backdoors, to get through the front page. Like this one.

I don’t know what actually happened, but I do feel what Patrick is talking about.

Boring and disgusting stuff like keeping the visitors coming by creating and updating pages on multiple social networking websites kills the fun. Of course, if you spend considerable amount of time you can find unique pearls in such garbage holes as twitter and facebook, but if you’re in the business, don’t wrinkle your nose and enjoy the stink.

Routine kills “the primary instinct” or the primary reason why we do it. For example, I like my self-bondage sessions when I have the corresponding mood and not when I have to do it because the house is empty for two days, or a new butt-plug or a latex leotard is waiting since three months ago, or I have to update the site with a new session.

But anyway, the bare fact that someone’s quit and deleted megabytes of his, her or our life is already a huge demotivator.

Can you think of any “motivators” besides this?