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Wood Suspension Frame
#1
In my tradition of building my own bondage gear, I've decided on my next project - a bondage frame. This is going to be a big project, so I'm doing some planning in advance to make sure everything goes well.

The current plan is a frame constructed from dimensional lumber (4x4s, 2x6s, etc.) that will fit around my bed and reach most of the way to the ceiling. With this in mind, I decided to throw it into a 3D modeling program to see how it would turn out.

sling frame.jpg thumbnail   

I've included the bed (queen size, for reference). The main posts are 4x4s, the 6 horizontal spans are 2x6s, and the 4 diagonal struts are 2x4s, all held in place with carriage bolts.

This design gives enough clearance for me to use the bed normally, has tie-off points at multiple elevations, and has the additional advantage of creating a St. Andrews Cross on the end. I plan on using it for full and partial suspension. I also thought it could be used as a whipping post by removing the long middle span on one side and tying to the middle, thus allowing for full 360 degree access with arms overhead.

sling frame 2.jpg thumbnail   

Now for a question. Does anyone see any structural issues I may have missed? Should I be bracing diagonally across the top? Will the double spans on both sides be sufficient to stop it from shearing in the long dimension? Should I be going about this differently? I have a physics background, not an engineering one, and would prefer not to have this come crumbling down the first time I put weight on it.
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#2
(04 Aug 2014, 04:13 )BoundWolf Wrote: Now for a question. Does anyone see any structural issues I may have missed? Should I be bracing diagonally across the top? Will the double spans on both sides be sufficient to stop it from shearing in the long dimension? Should I be going about this differently? I have a physics background, not an engineering one, and would prefer not to have this come crumbling down the first time I put weight on it.

I do have some engineering in my past and I'm sure that will wobble left to right very hard. First lesson in construction sturdy stuff: triangles everywhere. Some constructions don't allow for this for practical reasons, like my powercage for example, that is build with thick steel beams and still is not as sturdy as it looks.
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#3
(04 Aug 2014, 20:35 )Anne Wrote: I do have some engineering in my past and I'm sure that will wobble left to right very hard. First lesson in construction sturdy stuff: triangles everywhere. Some constructions don't allow for this for practical reasons, like my powercage for example, that is build with thick steel beams and still is not as sturdy as it looks.

Yeah, I was kind of worried about that. I still want to be able to get in and out of the middle without climbing over and around stuff - maybe only cross-brace on one side? Can I get away with a single strut, or do I need both? Hmm, maybe something like this?

sling frame 3.jpg thumbnail   

That way, I still have the mid-elevation beam for ties on both sides, but also the structural support.
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#4
Maybe you could use small diagonal stiffeners in each corner (about 40-50 cm). The corners would be stronger and the main opening would stay open
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#5
(05 Aug 2014, 07:26 )BoundWolf Wrote: maybe only cross-brace on one side? Can I get away with a single strut, or do I need both?

Indeed one side will be enough. If you put cross beams on 3 sides + top and build a frame around the base as you drew on top it will be very rigid. You can get away with steel cables under tension in stead of the beams but that's up to you.

You can get rid of the horizontal beams, they won't help for structural purposes. If you want to use them for tying that's of course fine Cool

Screw some rings in the frame for creative ropework Big Grin

Edit: jtr765 makes a good point as well.
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#6
(05 Aug 2014, 09:05 )jtr765 Wrote: Maybe you could use small diagonal stiffeners in each corner (about 40-50 cm). The corners would be stronger and the main opening would stay open

...*facepalm* You're absolutely right. I can't believe I missed that. Fool2

(05 Aug 2014, 21:22 )Anne Wrote: Indeed one side will be enough. If you put cross beams on 3 sides + top and build a frame around the base as you drew on top it will be very rigid. You can get away with steel cables under tension in stead of the beams but that's up to you.

You can get rid of the horizontal beams, they won't help for structural purposes. If you want to use them for tying that's of course fine Cool

While I like the idea of tensioned cables, I do have some reservations. In my mind, I'm seeing an eyebolt pulling out of the wood or the cable sliding out of a cable clamp. Also, it would be another set of tools that I'd need.

The horizontal beams in the middle were mainly there to create another level of tie points.

Based on jtr765's comment, how about this (as viewed from the inside looking toward the corner)?

sling frame 4.jpg thumbnail   

Anne's comment about framing around the base actually brings up something else I hadn't thought of: tie points at the bottom so that I can reduce swinging by tying downwards. I might add a couple of rails along the bottom for that.

Also, I just ran some quick calculations, and this thing is going to be a beast. It's looking to be something in the range of 250-300 lbs (115-135 kg) for the lumber. If I add that to the weight of my bed plus myself, that's something like a 700 lb (315 kg) dead load. As I'm thinking more about it, I might move the bed out to give me a little more buffer for live loads so I don't end up creating a skylight for my neighbors downstairs. Goodness, wouldn't that be embarrassing? Shok
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#7
I was looking at your little cage idea, and notice something that may or may not help. The two end assemblies seem fine, but connecting them together from the head of the bed to the foot of the bed seems to be problem.
The two crossmembers you have shown, looks like a cross. My question would be is " do these braces pass each other, and is there a gap of 2 inches between these braces?"
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#8
(06 Aug 2014, 16:24 )Tinker D Wrote: I was looking at your little cage idea, and notice something that may or may not help. The two end assemblies seem fine, but connecting them together from the head of the bed to the foot of the bed seems to be problem.
The two crossmembers you have shown, looks like a cross. My question would be is " do these braces pass each other, and is there a gap of 2 inches between these braces?"

I'm cross-lapping the braces on the end (a half lap joint), so both members will be flush against the post. I'll use a stronger wood for those members to make sure that center join isn't too weak.

For the corner braces, they will sit flush against the inside of the horizontal rails. At the top, it's connected to the top rail, while the bottom end is connected to both the center rail and directly into the post. The corner brace on top sits flush on top of everything.
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#9
Then it should be ok. But test it for wiggle failure.
I don't think you would want it come down while your playing.
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